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Mary Wu, Social Media Consultant

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LinkedIn Above the Fold

I love LinkedIn 

That’s not a secret – while I do education on all of the social media platforms, LinkedIn is the one that I favor for myself and my business. 

When a group asks me to do a short presentation on LinkedIn I’ll often opt for a presentation about the part of LinkedIn that appears “above the fold.” 

For those of you that are old enough to remember newspapers – “back in the day” newspapers would sell themselves based on what was on the top half of the first page of the paper. Interest had to be grabbed by someone walking past a newsstand or a newspaper vending machine based on what someone could see in a few seconds glance. 

There are 4 major sections of LinkedIn that can be seen “above the fold” and is someone is just glancing at your LinkedIn profile, whether it’s a potential client or employer, you want to grab their interest in this section of LinkedIn. 

The four most visible sections of your LinkedIn profile are the 

  • Images (both the profile and the background) 
  • Headline (120 or 220 characters of pure gold — read on to find out how to get an extra 100 characters here) 
  • Summary
  • Media

We’ll take these items one at a time. 

IMAGES 

There are two “images” at the top of your LinkedIn page. Your profile photo and your banner photo. 

For your profile image — use a CURRENT professional looking image. You want something with solid colors and a solid background. This is worth hiring a professional photographer – or looking around for someone offering headshots. If you are planning to meet a client or potential employer you want them to be able to recognize you from this photograph. 

For your banner photo, you can have a little more fun. This is an area where you can show something specific to your business — but be warned – views are subject to change at any time, so you may either want to play to keep an eye on this and update when necessary, or you may want to keep things simple, general, and without important points along the top, bottom, or sides of the banner. 

HEADLINE

After your name, there is a section you can edit for your headline. This is important because it shows up EVERYWHERE — when you make a post on LinkedIn it shows up – if you comment on someone’s post or article it shows up – and it even shows up in search engine results.

Here’s the deal — you have 120 characters 
OR — you have 220 characters. 

At last check – if you edited this on a desktop or laptop you were awarded 120 characters, but if you edited this on a PHONE you got 220 characters. 

Typically when I’m editing anything I’ll use a desktop (insert “ok boomer” here). I like the keyboard, BUT — editing my headline — that’s the one time I’ll go out of my way to use my phone. 

It’s not many characters — so try to make good use of it. 

SUMMARY 

The summary has a lot more characters than the headline. You might be tempted to use all the words and say many things but I’d caution you to remember that sometimes people are busy — so make sure you hit the top points that you’d like to make early on in the summary. You can then go on to be more detailed – but make sure you grab their interest right away. Also – MAKE SURE TO PUT YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION IN YOUR SUMMARY. If someone really wants to find you – give them many ways they can do that. 

You’ll want to use this section to tell people 

  • What you are
  • Who you help
  • How you make their life better
  • Proof that you are credible (feel free to add some of that proof to the “media” section) 

MEDIA 

You can add just about anything to the media section. Some examples:

  • Speaker sheet
  • Video from a presentation
  • Link to your podcast or book or website or Facebook group or 
  • Slideshow from a presentation

As of this writing (January 2020) you can use the following formats in the media section:

Adobe PDF (.pdf)
Microsoft PowerPoint (.ppt/.pps/.pptx/.ppsx/.pot/.potx)
Microsoft Word (.doc/.docx/.rtf)
.jpg/.jpeg
.png
.gif – this doesn’t support animation, however the first frame will be extracted

Important:

The file size may not exceed 100 MB.
The page limit is 300 with a 1 million word count limit
The maximum resolution for images in 120 megapixels.

If you’re looking at these instructions and it’s not making sense, GO TO THIS LINK to find out what LinkedIn says about media files. 

You can not currently upload video – but as of this writing, LinkedIn seems to allow you to link to a YouTube video. 

SUMMARY

(whoops I already used that) 

IN CONCLUSION 

LinkedIn is a powerful platform for getting connected (and staying connected) to your contacts. 

If you’re interested in learning more about LinkedIn – ask me about upcoming classes or workshops. I hold classes at local colleges, local libraries, and through my own online platform.  

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4 Simple Steps to LinkedIn Success

4 Simple Steps to LinkedIn Success

(Actually — 16)

DAILY

Take these steps every day to stay top of mind with your colleagues.

  1. Review your notifications. Did anyone comment on your posts? Does someone have a birthday coming up that you’d like to acknowledge? Does a connection have a new job you want to congratulate them on?
  2. Check timeline
    1. comment on posts or articles
    2. Share an update
  3. Check your messaging
  4. Check invitations (connection requests)

 

WEEKLY

Take these steps each week to showcase your expertise and solidify your brand.

  1. Post (an article, an update, an interactive question)
  2. Visit your groups
  3. Reach out to a current or former client, colleague, customer, or classmate
  4. Promote a product, service, or event

MONTHLY

Take these steps each month to deepen your connections.

  1. Save your connections to a spreadsheet
  2. Write one recommendation and request one recommendation
  3. Plan next month’s articles
  4. Review your new acquaintances and decide if there are new people to connect with (remember to send a message with a connection request)

YEARLY

Take these steps at least once per year to make sure your overall profile is up-to-date.

  1. Review your profile
    1. Your photo
    2. Your headline
    3. Your summary
      (do these items still reflect what you’d like to profile on LinkedIn)
  2. Review connections (do you need to add some or remove some)
  3. Review groups
  4. Review the media in your summary

 

How to add an Admin to your Facebook Business Page

Of all the social media platforms, Facebook has the highest traffic. While it might not be the best for every business, it is a standard.

If, however, you want to have someone else manage your Facebook business page, here’s how to do that.

Once you have your Facebook page set up, go to your business page and click on settings.

fbprofilesettings

You’ll get to another page and you’ll click on Page Roles.

fbprofilepageroles

And from here you can add anyone to your page as long as they are a “friend” of your personal profile.

faprofileaddadmin

You can add an Admin, Editor, Moderator, Advertiser, or Analyst. If you go to the Facebook help center, you can see what each role is able to do.

NOW – you can sit back, relax, and outsource your Facebook page management.

happy young woman relax at home on sofa in bright living room and watching tv

Outsourcing: A Worthy Investment

Outsource Definition Closeup Showing SubcontractingDuring the past two posts I might have convinced you to think about looking for some help. You might call people, get some quotes for some assistance, and then have sticker shock (especially if you have not had contractors working for you).

A few things to keep in mind. (more…)

Outsourcing: How to find help for your business

Outsource Definition Closeup Showing SubcontractingIn a previous post, I’ve suggested you find people to help you with tasks that don’t fall within your strong skills. You might note that nobody can do your job as well as you can. Nobody can love your business as much as you do. Nobody can understand your business to the same degree.

That’s probably true. If you decide to hire someone to help you with some of your work, you might need to spend MORE time upfront training that person (but I don’t have the time).

Money Time Buttons Showing Prosperity Or Income

In the Related Articles Section I have included an article titled The 6th Realization of Rich People — R.O.T.I. — Return on Time Investment. Following is an excerpt from that article …

A professor in one of my business classes taught me that “when trying to decide whether to delegate something to someone else or to do something yourself you should use the 30 to 1 rule.”

That is, that if it was a daily task that took a skilled person like yourself five minute to complete, you should plan to spend at least 150 minutes (5 minutes multiplied by 30) instructing the subordinate on how to complete the same task.

Now the 150 minutes shouldn’t all be done at one time and could be spread over a few months as you help the subordinate master the task.”

He then explained the math behind it.

“If a task were to take you personally 5 minutes a day for 250 days in a working year then that means you would spend 1250 minutes per year on that task.

Rather than doing that however, if you decided to spend 150 minutes training someone to do that 5-minute task and they instead did that task for you then that would give you an annual savings of 1100 minutes per year.”

Think about it just for a minute …

If you spent some time, up front, training someone to do a task for you, what would you do with the extra time that you found?  (more…)

Outsourcing: How to “Let it Go”

Outsource Definition Closeup Showing SubcontractingCopyrights probably forbid me from adding the lyrics, but I’m sure if I use the phrase “Let it Go” and suggest you think about recent Disney movies — well the song will be stuck in your head (see below).

I’ve written about outsourcing in the past (see Related Articles), but I think this is a good time for areview.

Today we’ll talk about why to outsource, next time we’ll talk about finding good people to work with, and after that, we’ll talk about costs.Stress. Woman stressed
Most of my readers are busy solopreneurs or small business owners, and most of then can define their life using one word — BUSY!!!

I know the feeling. Somewhat overwhelmed, somewhat confused (what do I do NEXT).

(more…)

Tuesday Tip – The 80/20 rule

ID-10079666Tuesday Tip*

Social media is my passion. I love helping clients connect through the virtual world.

Most people that I’ve talked to at workshops, networking groups, or while consulting have heard me mention the 80/20 rule, meaning 80% of content in your blogs, newsletters, and social media posts should be interesting content and only 20% should be promotional.

You may ask WHY? (You may not be asking this, you may just trust me and that’s cool.) 

One QUICK reason (this is a Tuesday Tip so I like to keep it under 200 words total) is that people want to do business with people they know, like, and trust. Having 80% of your content as interesting content gives your clients (and potential clients) a chance to get to know a bit about you so when you do mention your offers/classes/packages/promotions they will feel comfortable enough to take the plunge with you.

social-network_110002683-012814-intWhat does the 80% consist of?

  • Quotes & memes help people know who your influences are.
  • Humorous postings show people your fun side.
  • Informational articles show you are knowledgeable and follow current information.
  • Asking interactive questions encourages engagement.

 

There are many ways to build relationships – even virtually.

“Tips” image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

*Tuesday Tips are typically short, sweet, and to the point. A quick read and then back to your day.